Creativity comes from the Goddesses and Gods.  Sometimes they encourage us to go outside of ourselves to spark or respark our creatrix energies.  I've found writing prompts useful.   Who knows what you may discover, recover, bring to your own fiction. I'm a structured poet and fiction writer.  This means, I'll be giving you structured writing prompts.  Hopefully when you're done with the writing prompt/s, you'll have a better understanding about writings structure what it does for fiction.  These writing prompts aim to bring about your best writing, or fulfill missing plot links or round out your characters.  Use all or part or build from these CupiderosBooks.com Writing Prompts something worthy for yourself and entertaining to others.   
Enjoy.
  --Cupideros



CBWP 2009 P2--#1-04.02.09

Plot: Any kinds of story you want.  (If a structure category is left blank.  This means you decide the contents YDTC. 

Complication/Major Problem/s:
First Scene: Is about something that is COURAGEOUS.

Second Scene is about something ALTERING that courage.  This could be a positive or negative alteration.  The trick is to get familiar with using words to build your scenes.

Third Scene is about something that is SURPRISING about the altered scene.   This could be a positive or negative alteration.  The trick is to get familiar with using words to build your scenes.

Fourth Scene is about something that totally TRANSFORMS the situation.   This could be a positive or negative alteration.  The trick is to get familiar with using words to build your scenes.

CHARACTERS: YDTC
DIALOGUE: No dialogue--no story.  Interesting, eh.  This story wants not to be a story, but you will make it a story by getting the couple desperate to communicate with one another.  This may be the most important lesson to learn in this writing prompt.  Dialogue matters.
SETTING: YDTC
THEME: YDTC
POV: YDTC
ENDING: Happy ending. 
SPECIALITY: Decide which of these structured points is your speciality.  Play your speciality up in the story.  If you're good at settings, get into describing the settings.  Make the setting a major focus of the story.  If you're into plot, make the plot twist compelling.  if you're into theme, go deep into the theme, choose the right words by sound, taste, feel, smell to convey this theme.  If you're a master of dialogue, write a short play or screenplay or stage play.  Play up the words they use to resolve their difficulties.




CBWP 2009 P2--#2-04.18.09

Plot: Any kinds of story you want.  (If a structure category is left blank.  This means you decide the contents YDTC. 

Complication/Major Problem/s:
First Scene: Is about something that is HALTED and directly or indirectly impacts your Main Character.

Second Scene is about something ALTERING that HALTED PROJECT/ACTION.  This could be a ALTERED FOR A positive or ALTERED FOR A negative alteration.  The trick is to get familiar with using words to build your scenes.

Third Scene is about something that is PROVEN.   This could be a PROVEN FOR A positive or PROVEN FOR A negative alteration.  The trick is to get familiar with using words to build your scenes.

Fourth Scene is about something that totally TESTS your Main Character.   This could be a TESTED FOR A positive or TESTED FIR A negative alteration.  The trick is to get familiar with using words to build your scenes.

CHARACTERS: YDTC
DIALOGUE: No dialogue--no story.  Interesting, eh.  Dialogue matters.
SETTING: YDTC
THEME: YDTC
POV: YDTC
ENDING: YDTC. 
SPECIALITY: Decide which of these structured points is your speciality.  Play your speciality up in the story.  If you're good at settings, get into describing the settings.  Make the setting a major focus of the story.  If you're into plot, make the plot twist compelling.  if you're into theme, go deep into the theme, choose the right words by sound, taste, feel, smell to convey this theme.  If you're a master of dialogue, write a short play or screenplay or stage play.  Play up the words they use to resolve their difficulties.



CBWP 2009 P2--#3-04.25.09

Plot: Any kinds of story you want.  (If a structure category is left blank.  This means you decide the contents YDTC.)   The scene is the big enchilada of a story or novel.  Everything happens in real time confrontations, blame game, discoveries and betrayals.  Imagine you're seeing this in a movie in your mind.  Write what you see.  Narration is the transition glue moving the story forward in an intellectual, mind sense.  It's like the "here's what my character thought about that scene" section.  Lots of things can be done with narration, but a story or novel without scenes is just boring.  If you've watch any movies, you watch--guess what--only the scenes.  Movies are nothing but one scene after another. 

Complication/Major Problem/s:
First ACT/Scene: Write about something unusual you or your character from an unfinished story or novel saw the day before.

Second ACT/Scene: Write about the first time you  or your character from a unfinished story or novel did something.

Third ACT/Scene:  Write about the worst day your character from an unfinished story or novel ever had.

Fourth ACT/Scene: Write about something you or your character from an unfinished story or novel loves to do.

Fifth ACT/Scene: Write about something you or your character from an unfinished story or novel that PROVES SOMETHING FOR A POSITIVE OR A NEGATIVE.

CHARACTERS: YDTC

DIALOGUE: No dialogue--no story.  Interesting, eh.   Dialogue matters.

SETTING: YDTC

THEME:  Theme could be why men don't understand women?  Why life throws us grapefruit to make grapefruit aid?  Why women want love?  This would be the thread underlining all your five scenes.

POV: YDTC

ENDING: YDTC. 

SPECIALITY: Decide which of these structured points is your speciality.  Play your speciality up in the story.  If you're good at settings, get into describing the settings.  Make the setting a major focus of the story.  If you're into plot, make the plot twist compelling.  if you're into theme, go deep into the theme, choose the right words by sound, taste, feel, smell to convey this theme.  If you're a master of dialogue, write a short play or screenplay or stage play.  Play up the words they use to resolve their difficulties. 

You may find, doing these five scenes you have enough for a novel.  You may simply write a poem.  Key is to realize you can take any events and string them together to make good plots. 




CBWP 2009 P2--#4-05.02.09

Plot: Any kinds of story you want.  (If a structure category is left blank.  This means you decide the contents YDTC.) 

Complication/Major Problem/s:
First ACT/Scene: Describe the views from you or your character's window from an unfinished story or novel .  Don't sweat this.  Just have fun.  It's just like writing a poem.  Try to write the best thing you can, but in the end relax and have fun.  We all grow at different speeds in our writing.  This website's purpose is to help you continue to grow your writing skills, imagining skills.

Second ACT/Scene: Have your character from an unfinished story or novel write a letter to a friend.

Third ACT/Scene:  Have your character from an unfinished story or novel Imagine what their life would be like if it were perfect.

Fourth ACT/Scene: Have your character from an unfinished story or novel write about the sound of something.  Could be the sound of an egg frying in butter.  Then take this sound and connected it to something about life,  Go philosophical about how the sound of egg frying in butter is a metaphor for the life of the rich and famous, or the agony of the poor and down and out for example.

Fifth ACT/Scene: Have your character from an unfinished story or novel sum up all these experiences.  This will be your ending.  You'll have the character talking about their emotions, thoughts here.  This will be the big sequel of character reflecting.

CHARACTERS: YDTC

DIALOGUE: No dialogue--no story.  Interesting, eh.  Dialogue matters.

SETTING: YDTC

THEME: YDTC

POV: First Person Point of View: The I looked outside my window and saw three kangaroos hoping in line wearing  flip flops.

ENDING: YDTC. 

SPECIALITY: Decide which of these structured points is your speciality.  Play your speciality up in the story.  If you're good at settings, get into describing the settings.  Make the setting a major focus of the story.  If you're into plot, make the plot twist compelling.  if you're into theme, go deep into the theme, choose the right words by sound, taste, feel, smell to convey this theme.  If you're a master of dialogue, write a short play or screenplay or stage play.  Play up the words they use to resolve their difficulties.















CBWP 2009 P2--#5-05.09.09

Plot: Any kinds of story you want.  (If a structure category is left blank.  This means you decide the contents YDTC.)    Several ways exist to structure a novel or story.  Three acts.  Five acts.  Five acts works the best in my opinion.

Complication/Major Problem/s:

Basically divide your how many chapters or scenes you have by five.  If you have ten chapters,
FIRST ACT: Chapter 1-2
SECOND ACT: Chapter 3-4
THIRD ACT: Chapter 5-6
FOURTH ACT: Chapter 7-8
FIFTH ACT: Chapter 9-10

First ACT/Scene: Introduce your characters.  Who they are?  Where they live?  Who they come into contact with?  What's their initial problem they grappling to solve?

Second ACT/Scene: Is where you show your character trying to solve their problem, only the problem keeps getting worse or more complicated as irreversible events take place.  Those early character introductions and scenes now begin to reveal themselves: who are the bad players or good players.  Supporters or Foes.  We understand more about your Main Character (MC) as we see her interacting in her environment and with other characters.  Slowly you are peeling back the onion layers of your character from an unfinished story or novel. 

Third ACT/Scene: This is the biggest scene in your novel or story.  The big revelations, secrets come out.  The things driving your character to hate the world or someone else.  The big reasons behind some of  your characters strange unexplained or unexplainable actions in Acts/Scenes 1 and 2.

Fourth ACT/Scene: This is where things get desperate for your Main Character (MC) or heroine.  It seems the evil characters or Opposition/Impact Character (OC/IC) has won.  They've defeated her.  THIS IS YOUR HEROINE'S WORSE DAY ACT/SCENE!  If they don't do something now!  All is lost.  This is your Main Character (MC) or heroine's "I'LL BE BACK" Act/Scene

Fifth ACT/Scene: This is your Main Character (MC) or heroine's "I'M BACK!  AND I'M MAD AS HELL TOO!" Act/Scene.  Your heroines finds new resources she never thought she had.  She uses her skill from long ago, childhood maybe to win the battle.  She drops a bad habit that's been holding her back and therefore wins the day.

CHARACTERS: YDTC
DIALOGUE: No dialogue--no story.  Interesting, eh.  This story wants not to be a story, but you will make it a story by getting the couple desperate to communicate with one another.  This may be the most important lesson to learn in this writing prompt.  Dialogue matters.
SETTING: YDTC
THEME: YDTC
POV: YDTC
ENDING: YDTC. 
SPECIALITY: Decide which of these structured points is your speciality.  Play your speciality up in the story.  If you're good at settings, get into describing the settings.  Make the setting a major focus of the story.  If you're into plot, make the plot twist compelling.  if you're into theme, go deep into the theme, choose the right words by sound, taste, feel, smell to convey this theme.  If you're a master of dialogue, write a short play or screenplay or stage play.  Play up the words they use to resolve their difficulties.


















CBWP 2009 P2--#6-05.16.09

Plot: Any kinds of story you want.  (If a structure category is left blank.  This means you decide the contents YDTC.)

Complication/Major Problem/s:
First ACT/Scene: Is about something that is TRUSTED and directly or indirectly impacts your Main Character.

Second ACT/Scene is about something ALTERING that TRUSTED PROJECT/ACTION.  This could be a ALTERED FOR A positive or ALTERED FOR A negative alteration.  The trick is to get familiar with using words to build your scenes.

Third ACT/Scene is about something that is TEMPTING.   This could be a TEMPTING FOR A positive or PROVEN FOR A negative reason.  The trick is to get familiar with using words to build your scenes.  Remember in the FIVE ACT/SCENE structure.  This is the biggest scene in your novel or story.  The big revelations, secrets come out.  The things driving your character to hate the world or someone else; or love the world or someone else.  The big reasons behind some of  your characters strange unexplained or unexplainable actions in Acts/Scenes 1 and 2.

Fourth ACT/Scene is about something that totally provides KNOWLEDGE to your Main Character.   This could be a KNOWLEDGE FOR A positive or KNOWLEDGE FOR A negative reason.  The trick is to get familiar with using words to build your scenes.  Remember in the FIVE ACT/SCENE structure.  This is where your Main Character (MC) or heroine has practically lost the battle.  It seems the evil characters or Opposition/Impact Character (OC/IC) has won.  They've defeated her.  THIS IS YOUR HEROINE'S WORSE DAY ACT/SCENE!  If they don't do something now!  All is lost.  This is your Main Character (MC) or heroine's "I'LL BE BACK" Act/Scene.

Fifth ACT/Scene: is about something that is NON ACCURATE to your Main Character.   This could be a NONACCURATE FOR A positive or NONACCURATE FOR A negative reason.  REMEMBER this is your Main Character (MC) or heroine's "I'M BACK!  AND I'M MAD AS HELL TOO!" Act/Scene.

CHARACTERS: YDTC
DIALOGUE: No dialogue--no story.  Interesting, eh.  This story wants not to be a story, but you will make it a story by getting the couple desperate to communicate with one another.  This may be the most important lesson to learn in this writing prompt.  Dialogue matters.
SETTING: YDTC
THEME: YDTC
POV: YDTC
ENDING: YDTC. 
SPECIALITY: Decide which of these structured points is your speciality.  Play your speciality up in the story.  If you're good at settings, get into describing the settings.  Make the setting a major focus of the story.  If you're into plot, make the plot twist compelling.  if you're into theme, go deep into the theme, choose the right words by sound, taste, feel, smell to convey this theme.  If you're a master of dialogue, write a short play or screenplay or stage play.  Play up the words they use to resolve their difficulties.




CBWP 2009 P2--#7-05.23.09

Plot: Any kinds of story you want.  (If a structure category is left blank.  This means you decide the contents YDTC.)  It's amazing how different characters in a story remember things differently.  The bad characters think they were noble.  The good characters may not be sure they were good.  Take advantage of this because real life is like this.  Real life simulations is what you want in your fiction.

Complication/Major Problem/s:
First ACT/Scene: Create an event, initial event problem for your Main Character.  Describe how she dealt with this event. 

Second ACT/Scene: Is how the Opposition/Impact Character saw  or dealt with that same event.

Third ACT/Scene:is how the Main Character's best friend describes and dealt with the event.  The best friend doesn't have to be there when the actual event takes place.  She/he merely has to say, I would have dealt with this like so.

Fourth ACT/Scene is how someone who finds your Main Character annoying describes and dealt with the event. 

Fifth ACT/Scene is how the situation was actually resolved.


CHARACTERS: YDTC
DIALOGUE: No dialogue--no story.  Interesting, eh.  Dialogue matters.
SETTING: YDTC
THEME: YDTC
POV: YDTC
ENDING: YDTC. 
SPECIALITY: Decide which of these structured points is your speciality.  Play your speciality up in the story.  If you're good at settings, get into describing the settings.  Make the setting a major focus of the story.  If you're into plot, make the plot twist compelling.  if you're into theme, go deep into the theme, choose the right words by sound, taste, feel, smell to convey this theme.  If you're a master of dialogue, write a short play or screenplay or stage play.  Play up the words they use to resolve their difficulties.




CBWP 2009 P2--#8-06.3.09

Plot: Any kinds of story you want, but the focus is on Point of View (POV).  We talked about this in Writing Lesson 8.   Today, you play Goddess or God your characters.  Heck that's all writers do if they do anything in well in their fiction.  You, the narrator, will be inside everyone's head.  You will inform us of the thoughts, moods, feelings, speculations of your three characters. 

Two of these characters must be human.  The third character must be nonhuman; it could be a window pane, tree, a cloud passing by.  The lesson to learn is loosening up your writing and thinking about your characters.  If you restrain from going inside a character's head, First Person POV, you still must do those character's mind that the reader cannot perceive!  You simply never put it down on paper in the story.  Maybe you put it on your character sheet:  Character B thinks Character J is a liar.  Only Character A is the Main Character in a First Person POV story or novel.  So Character B can never verbally process what he thinks about Character J.  See the problem!  You, the narrator, must do the deep processing for Character B. 

You're probably saying, I'll just have Character B say out loud to Character J he/she is a liar.  You could.  Though that's not good enough.  The tendency is to simplify and provide trivial reasons for Character B to think aka by saying out loud Character J is a liar.  If you were in the Goddess/God POV, you could really dig into why Character B thinks Character J is a liar!


Complication/Major Problem/s:   REFER BACK TO THE FIVE SCENE MEANINGS & STRUCTURE WRITING PROMPT CBWP 2009 P2--#5-05.09.09

First ACT/Scene: Create an event, initial event problem for your Main Character.  Describe how she dealt with this event.  All three characters A, B, C (nonhuman) see this event. 

Second ACT/Scene: One of these three characters is enlightened by this event. 

Third ACT/Scene: One of the previously unenlightened characters tries to put this event into pragmatic action.  This fails.  The original enlightened character still holds on to the transformation possibilities.

Fourth ACT/Scene: One of the previously unenlightened characters not only gives up but tries to destroy the enlightened concept learned.  This puts the other two characters on the fence of delimena.  Should the one who tried it give up for good?  Has the original enlightened character seen a mirage. 

Fifth ACT/Scene is how the situation was actually resolved.


CHARACTERS: YDTC
DIALOGUE: No dialogue--no story.  Interesting, eh.  You can't use all dialogue because you'll need narration to express the hidden mind thoughts of these three characters.
SETTING: YDTC.  In Goddess/God POV you can be any place, any time.
THEME: YDTC.
POV: Goddess/God POV
ENDING: YDTC. 
SPECIALITY: Decide which of these structured points is your speciality.  Play your speciality up in the story.  If you're good at settings, get into describing the settings.  Make the setting a major focus of the story.  If you're into plot, make the plot twist compelling.  if you're into theme, go deep into the theme, choose the right words by sound, taste, feel, smell to convey this theme.  If you're a master of dialogue, write a short play or screenplay or stage play.  Play up the words they use to resolve their difficulties.




CBWP 2009 P2--#9-06.13.09

Plot: Any kinds of story you want, but the focus is on Point of View (POV).  We talked about this in Writing Lesson 8.   Today, you become a camera.  You have video, sound and that's it!  You, the narrator, cannot be inside everyone's head.  You can inform us of the thoughts, moods, feelings, speculations of your three characters from what they have physically displayed. 

Two of these characters must be human.  The third character must be nonhuman; it could be a window pane, tree, a cloud passing by.  The lesson to learn is loosening up your writing and thinking about your characters.  If you restrain from going inside any character's head, Camera POV, you still must do those character's mind that the reader cannot perceive!  You simply never put it down on paper in the story.  Maybe you put it on your character sheet:  Character B thinks Character J is a liar.  Only Character A is the Main Character in a First Person POV story or novel.  So Character B can never verbally process what he thinks about Character J.  See the problem!  You, the narrator, must do the deep processing for all characters and then find the correct way to demonstrate this to the reader or audience.

If this sounds familiar, it is the movie POV.  Screenplay POV.

You're probably saying, I'll just have Character B say out loud to Character J he/she is a liar.  You could.  Though that's not good enough.  The tendency is to simplify and provide trivial ways to show Character B thinks aka by saying out loud Character J is a liar.  If you were a camera or movie director, you have to think harder how to show your character's internal thoughts, feelings, moods through visual imagery.

Visual Imagery *hint*  *hint*.

Show us what curiosity really looks like to your three characters in this writing prompt.


Complication/Major Problem/s:
First ACT/Scene: Create an event, initial event problem for your Main Character.  Describe how she dealt with this event.  All three characters A, B, C (nonhuman) see this event. 

Second ACT/Scene: One of these three characters is enlightened by this event. 

Third ACT/Scene: One of the previously unenlightened characters tries to put this event into pragmatic action.  This fails.  The original enlightened character still holds on to the transformation possibilities.

Fourth ACT/Scene: One of the previously unenlightened characters not only gives up but tries to destroy the enlightened concept learned.  This puts the other two characters on the dilemma fence.  Should the one who tried it give up for good?  Has the original enlightened character seen a mirage?

Fifth ACT/Scene is how the situation was actually resolved.


CHARACTERS: YDTC
DIALOGUE: No dialogue--no story.  Interesting, eh.  This may be the most important lesson to learn in this writing prompt.  Dialogue matters.  You're almost forced to do dialogue, but-- let us suppose you can visual through imagery show us something.  Now it doesn't need to be said at all.

SETTING: YDTC.  In Camera POV you can be any place, any time if the camera can move.  If the Camera is fixed, mounted on a street corner or sitting on a tripod on the patio--well things get tougher.
THEME: YDTC.
POV: Camera POV
ENDING: YDTC. 
SPECIALITY: Decide which of these structured points is your speciality.  Play your speciality up in the story.  If you're good at settings, get into describing the settings.  Make the setting a major focus of the story.  If you're into plot, make the plot twist compelling.  if you're into theme, go deep into the theme, choose the right words by sound, taste, feel, smell to convey this theme.  If you're a master of dialogue, write a short play or screenplay or stage play.  Play up the words they use to resolve their difficulties.
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