CUPIDEROSBOOKS.COM WRITING PROMPTS 2009
Creativity comes from the Goddesses and Gods.  Sometimes they encourage us to go outside of ourselves to spark or respark our creatrix energies.  I've found writing prompts useful.   Who knows what you may discover, recover, bring to your own fiction. I'm a structured poet and fiction writer.  This means, I'll be giving you structured writing prompts.  Hopefully when you're done with the writing prompt/s, you'll have a better understanding about writings structure what it does for fiction.  These writing prompts aim to bring about your best writing, or fulfill missing plot links or round out your characters.  Use all or part or build from these CupiderosBooks.com Writing Prompts something worthy for yourself and entertaining to others.   
Enjoy.
  --Cupideros



CBWP 2009-1
Plot: A boy-girl love flash/short/novel.  (A love story)  Remember in the best fiction, something irreversible happens.  The Main Character (MC) and the Obstacle Character (OC) or Antagonist cannot go back to their former life or standard.  Perhaps, they've made an arrangement to go camping once a week because one of the couple loves camping.  Whatever it is, they cannot get out of the plots initial event or starting point.  They're stuck until the story ends or until someone releases their agreement about love, camping or whatever is causing the problem.
Complication/Major Problem/s: Intervals of 3 to 5 minutes must ensue between each character's speaking.  One character can speak, but no more than 3 to 5 minutes.  Then they must remain silent while the opposite character speaks.  You provide the rational, explanation, cause as to why this is.  The longer the work, the more spin off problems come from the initial complication/major problem.
CHARACTERS: Boy-Girl.  You decide who is MC or OC.  Have fun with this, but get into the characters and find out what they want.  Do more than describe what the boy-girl look like?  Why have they subjected themselves to this scenario/s.  What's at stake for each of them?  Who started this non-talking for 3 to 5 minutes?
DIALOGUE: No dialogue--no story.  Interesting, eh.  This story wants not to be a story, but you will make it a story by getting the couple desperate to communicate with one another.  This may be the most important lesson to learn in this writing prompt.  Dialogue matters.
SETTING: Outside somewhere, camping, fishing, tourist trip, sailing, etc.
THEME: You supply this.  Maybe it means we all want to connect; maybe it means we all want to disconnect; Maybe it means talking is useless.  Maybe it means no talking, no love.  Maybe it means nature does the talking and we just listen.  *shrugs*   :)
POV: OMNISICENT / 3RD PERSON/ 3RD PERSON MINOR CHARACTER
ENDING: Happy ending. 
SPECIALITY: Decide which of these structured points is your speciality.  Play your speciality up in the story.  If you're good at settings, get into describing the settings.  Make the setting a major focus of the story.  If you're into plot, make the plot twist compelling.  if you're into theme, go deep into the theme, choose the right words by sound, taste, feel, smell to convey this theme.  If you're a master of dialogue, write a short play or screenplay or stage play.  Play up the words they use to resolve their difficulties.


CBWP 2009-2
Plot: A chase  flash/short/novel.  (Some one chases another story)  Remember in the best fiction, something irreversible happens.  The Main Character (MC) and the Obstacle Character (OC) or Antagonist cannot go back to their former life or standard.  Doesn't have to be a crime/action flick but it could be.  Maybe someone is chasing a butterfly? 
Complication/Major Problem/s: Main Character doesn't want to chase anybody but is forced to. The Obstacle Character wants to be chased.  You provide the rational, explanation, cause as to why this is.  The longer the work, the more spin off problems come from the initial complication/major problem.
CHARACTERS: Boy-Girl/Girl-Girl/Boy-Boy/Group-Group/Human-Animal/Human-Object (Think Indiana Jones).  You decide who is MC or OC.  Have fun with this, but get into the characters and find out what they want.  Do more than describe what characters/animal/object look like?  Why have they subjected themselves to this scenario/s.  What's at stake for each of them?  Why is this chase important? Is this the search for El Dorado?
DIALOGUE: No dialogue--no story.  Interesting, eh.  This story wants not to be a story, because you're always chasing someone, but you will make it a story by getting dialogue in the story.  Dukes of Hazzard, etc.  Dialogue matters.
SETTING: Anywhere, etc.
THEME: You supply this.  Why is chasing after what we want important?   *shrugs*   :)
POV: 3RD PERSON/1ST PERSON
ENDING: Happy ending or sad ending.
SPECIALITY: Decide which of these structured points is your speciality.  Play your speciality up in the story.  If you're good at settings, get into describing the settings.  Make the setting a major focus of the story.  If you're into plot, make the plot twist compelling.  if you're into theme, go deep into the theme, choose the right words by sound, taste, feel, smell to convey this theme.  If you're a master of dialogue, write a short play or screenplay or stage play.  Play up the words they use to resolve their difficulties.






CBWP 2009-3
Plot: Love story, chase story, quests story, revenge story, rise and fall story--you decide. 
Complication/Major Problem/s: You decide.  Whatever it is, it's irreversible.  The Girl find out she's a millionaire and has a lost sister who lives in the slums somewhere for example.  Whatever it is things get progressively worse or more complicated before they're solved in the end.  Or connections and disconnections plague your MC and OC until they resolve their difficulties in the end.
CHARACTERS: Up to you.  Find this character on a blog picture or art picture like on www.deviantart.com or flicker.  You goal is not to create fan fiction, but to practice describing characters by outward appearance.  The inward character is blank and you must supply this.  In characterization, we can easily supply the outside part.  It is the inside the character part we struggle with.  Describe the  person by outward appearance, but go deep into who and why the person came to be.  Why is she a millionaire?  What does it mean to her?  Give her an Obstacle Character to struggle against.  We don't fully know our characters until we see them in action and speaking in the story.
DIALOGUE: No dialogue--no story.  Interesting, eh.  Dialogue matters.
SETTING: Anywhere, etc.
THEME: You supply this.  Is having money important?    *shrugs*   :)
POV: OMNISICENT OR 3RD PERSON or 1ST PERSON OR CAMERA-FLY ON WALL
ENDING: Happy ending
SPECIALITY: As you can see, I've only helped you out with the character this time.  *shrug*  :)Still, decide which of these structured points is your speciality.  Play your speciality up in the story.  If you're good at settings, get into describing the settings.  Make the setting a major focus of the story.  If you're into plot, make the plot twist compelling.  if you're into theme, go deep into the theme, choose the right words by sound, taste, feel, smell to convey this theme.  If you're a master of dialogue, write a short play or screenplay or stage play.  Play up the words they use to resolve their difficulties.


CBWP 2009-4
Plot: Love story, chase story, quests story, revenge story, rise and fall story--you decide. 
Complication/Major Problem/s: You decide.  Whatever it is, it's irreversible. 
CHARACTERS:   Look at the pictures below.  You may not believe it but she's a pirate.
Your writing prompt job is to explain, how she became a pirate.  Pick one of these women.  Let's skip the old, she was kidnapped, raped and fought her way up the ranks to Pirate Queen.  Nah.  Nah.  Do something different.  This will supply you with a MC and OC and COMPLICATION/PROBLEM and
a PLOT.  Make it a Happy Ending.  Long or as short as you want.   Some say characters are the plot in action. 














DIALOGUE: No dialogue--no story.  Interesting, eh.  Dialogue matters.
SETTING: Anywhere, etc.
THEME: You supply this.  Do pirates need money?  What do pirates need most? *shrugs*   :)
POV: 1ST PERSON  So in this case your story, if told from the MC POV might start like this.
I know what you're thinking.  I don't look like a pirate.  Well it's true.  And my family never thought I'd become a pirate.  In fact, they don't even know I am one of the meanest pirates in the Atlantic--if you cross me.  Otherwise, I'm simply your average stay-at-home mom from the suburbs.
ENDING: Happy ending
SPECIALITY: As you can see, I've only helped you out with the character this time.  *shrug*  :)Still, decide which of these structured points is your speciality.  Play your speciality up in the story.  If you're good at settings, get into describing the settings.  Make the setting a major focus of the story.  If you're into plot, make the plot twist compelling.  if you're into theme, go deep into the theme, choose the right words by sound, taste, feel, smell to convey this theme.  If you're a master of dialogue, write a short play or screenplay or stage play.  Play up the words they use to resolve their difficulties.
















CBWP 2009-5  February 13, 2009
I just love a good love story, don't you.   Okay, go here:
harlequincelebrates.com
Fill out the nine quick tiny questions.  You'll get something like this:

MY HARLEQUIN ROMANCE  

To escape the persistent women who were always hot on his heels for attention, billionaire Captain Iron Rod impulsively asks his hopelessly romantic office cleaner to be his convenient mistress!

Sierra reluctantly agrees—who would say no to such an incredibly attractive and commanding adventurer? He's wealthy with a glamorous lifestyle to match, while she can only dream of someday seeing the Grand Canyon and becoming a glamorous socialite. What she hasn't realized is her role isn't just to be on his arm in public—but to be his brainy mistress in private, too!

Well....
Your tasks is to structure this like before.
Plot: Love story.  It's a Harlequin Romance after all.
Complication/Major Problem/s: To escape the persistent women who were always hot on his heels for attention, billionaire Captain Iron Rod impulsively asks his hopelessly romantic office cleaner to be his convenient mistress!

Sierra reluctantly agrees—who would say no to such an incredibly attractive and commanding adventurer? He's wealthy with a glamorous lifestyle to match, while she can only dream of someday seeing the Grand Canyon and becoming a glamorous socialite. What she hasn't realized is her role isn't just to be on his arm in public—but to be his brainy mistress in private, too!  Sound familiar.

Again things get progressively worse or more complicated before they're solved in the end.  Or connections and disconnections plague your MC and OC until they resolve their difficulties in the end.
CHARACTERS: Sierra and Captain Iron Rod. Find these character on a blog picture or art picture like on www.deviantart.com or flicker.  Practice describing characters by outward appearance.  Build more inner characteristics from the preliminary questions you already answered.  Sierra was hopelessly romantic, brainy and feisty--just so you'd know, if using this as your story.  We know the captain is wealthy, likes glamorous lifestyle and is an adventurer who is shy about marriage.  We don't fully know our characters until we see them in action and speaking in the story.
DIALOGUE: No dialogue--no story.  Interesting, eh.  Dialogue matters.
SETTING: You can change this if you want.  For example, maybe Sierra is a scullery maid cleaning Captain Iron Rod's cabin.  Or maybe, Sierra is cleaning his office in Sarasota, Florida in 1860s.
THEME: You supply this.  Those who flee from love find love.   Love wins out in the end. 
POV: OMNISICENT OR 3RD PERSON or 1ST PERSON  because it's a romance novel.
ENDING: Happy ending
SPECIALITY: As you can see, I've only helped you out with the character this time.  *shrug*  :) Still, decide which of these structured points is your speciality.  Play your speciality up in the story.  If you're good at settings, get into describing the settings.  Make the setting a major focus of the story.  If you're into plot, make the plot twist compelling.  if you're into theme, go deep into the theme, choose the right words by sound, taste, feel, smell to convey this theme.  If you're a master of dialogue, write a short play or screenplay or stage play.  Play up the words they use to resolve their difficulties.



CBWP 2009-6  February 13, 2009
Okay I've did another preliminary story from the Harlequin website.
Your tasks is to structure this like I did before.  A story, whether a novel or a poem or anything in between, is a recipe.   Separate and gather the ingredients.  Then make your meal!

MY HARLEQUIN ROMANCE  

Maestro Valtrolli, wealthy tycoon and captain of the infamous ship Calypso and a renowned seducer of women, has just walked into the one tavern in all of New York City he should have avoided. For Johanna, his sworn enemy, is the coy owner—and she has vengeance on her mind.

But before she can take her carefree revenge, she is captured by this rogue's kiss. Her only chance for retribution is to put her career as the world's greatest mom on hold and stow away on his ship for a passionate adventure that will either kill them—or bring them together once and for all!

Ahem...a tad more complicated, but you can handle it.

Plot:
Complication/Major Problem/s:

Again things get progressively worse or more complicated before they're solved in the end.  Or connections and disconnections plague your MC and OC until they resolve their difficulties in the end.
CHARACTERS:

We don't fully know our characters until we see them in action and speaking in the story.
DIALOGUE: No dialogue--no story.  Interesting, eh.  Dialogue matters.
SETTING:
THEME:
POV: .
ENDING:
SPECIALITY:








CBWP 2009-7  February 16, 2009
Feminist are worth writing about.  Google famous women quotes or  go here:
FEMINISTEZINE.COM
Pick out a quote:


"Well behaved women rarely make history."

Use this quote as the Plot or Plot Complicatin/Problem or Theme or Main Character Characterization of your story, novel, flash or poem.  You may want to sit and think or ponder this for a minute or two or three or five.

Now structure this like before.
Plot: Love Story, Revenge, Fall and Rise Story, you decide?
Complication/Major Problem/s: Scarlet closed her little book by Virginia Wolf.  Like most teenagers, she felt unimpressed by Victorian women.  They wore killer corsets and Scarlet would love to have a dainty little one in satin white.  Scarlet was well behaved like Victorian women.  As as a little girl, she sat up straight in her chair.  She dressed neat. Spoke quietly.  Her black ponytails didn't bounce around wildly.  Scarlet ate all her vegetables, even asparagus.  She listened attentively to family discussions between her mom and dad.  Scarlet continued this perfect behavior through middle school too.  She earned As in class.  Her teachers liked her on a professional level.  Why then was life passing her by, Scarlet wondered?  She leaned forward in her chair to catch her reflection in the wall mirror.  She wasn't ugly or pretty or plain. She flopped back in her chair and slouched and her black nail polished hands picked up the dry tome again and read the inscription: Well behaved women rarely make history.  Her wacky redhair aunt, who traveled around the world before she was 20, wrote it.  Her aunt also broke up their family bliss on her one and only visit.  Slamming the book on the kitchen table, upsetting the asparagus of all things, before she booked another flight to Ireland.  Scarlet never liked asparagus and perhaps this is why she offered to clean off the book and save it for whenever her flame-hair aunt would return, which Scarlet suspected would be like never ever.  A Room of  Her Own.  It was too obvious to Scarlet, not only was she in a room of her own, a well-supplied one with computer, blackberry and enough stuff teddy bears to supply ToysRus International, she couldn't get out of her room!  MSH wasn't a likely place to make history.  Then again, like the quote says, the well behaved wouldn't know a history making place if it hit them over the head.  She could make history at MSH.  A little misbehavior, a shorter school uniform skirt, maybe a few Bs while she dreamed up a great way to make the students and teachers of MSH remember her as a great woman was all she needed to do.

CHARACTERS: Scarlet.  You'll need an Obstacle Character, could be girl or boy, student or teacher.  Maybe the student class or in this case the school as a whole.

We don't fully know our characters until we see them in action and speaking in the story.
DIALOGUE: No dialogue--no story.  Interesting, eh.  Dialogue matters.
SETTING: MS High School. Let's say 1990s.
THEME: You supply this.   
POV: 1ST PERSON  because it's a personal story.
ENDING: Happy ending
SPECIALITY: As you can see, I've only helped you out with the character this time.  *shrug*  :) Still, decide which of these structured points is your speciality.  Play your speciality up in the story.  If you're good at settings, get into describing the settings.  Make the setting a major focus of the story.  If you're into plot, make the plot twist compelling.  if you're into theme, go deep into the theme, choose the right words by sound, taste, feel, smell to convey this theme.  If you're a master of dialogue, write a short play or screenplay or stage play.  Play up the words they use to resolve their difficulties.  You can find a copy of Virgina Wolf's A Room of Her Own on my Feminist-1 under blog links.


CBWP 2009-8  February 18, 2009
Fifteen thousand writing prompts


CBWP 2009-9  February 20, 2009
Words to use for each line.

hem
hiss
hoo
splish
splat
whish

curio
figurine
streamer
beach towel

con spirito
arrangement


















CBWP 2009-9  March 2, 2009

Create a structured story with these WORD elements:
Man and Woman, they could be teenagers if you want.   While proceeding to a blind date  (arranged meeting between previously unacquainted people) on a bullet train  (very fast express train), their pupils  (round contractile aperture in iris of eye) catch each other's eye.  Someone, she probably has a  topknot ( tuft, roll, or fluff of hair at crown) and someone is reading a  billet-doux  (love letter).  You must use the word billet-doux in the story.  This has symbolic implications later on.  Don't make the two sitting in the same two seats half an inch from each other on the train.  They are perhaps in aisle seats, close enough but far enough away for mystery.

Last ingredents add  two-time  [(verb) Informal. jilt or betray, esp. one’s lover] and con spirito.

Plot: You decide. I'm thinking a love story, hint hint.
Complication/Major Problem/s: You derive from information above.
CHARACTERS: You supply their names
DIALOGUE: No dialogue--no story.  Interesting, eh.  This story wants not to be a story, because you're always chasing someone, but you will make it a story by getting dialogue in the story.  Dukes of Hazzard, etc.  Dialogue matters.
SETTING: Given, although there are more ways to do this.  :)
THEME: You supply this. 
POV: 3RD PERSON/1ST PERSON/CAMERA ON WALL
ENDING: You supply this.
SPECIALITY: Decide which of these structured points is your speciality.  Play your speciality up in the story.  If you're good at settings, get into describing the settings.  Make the setting a major focus of the story.  If you're into plot, make the plot twist compelling.  if you're into theme, go deep into the theme, choose the right words by sound, taste, feel, smell to convey this theme.  If you're a master of dialogue, write a short play or screenplay or stage play.  Play up the words they use to resolve their difficulties.


CBWP 2009-10  March 3, 2009
Words to use for each poem line OR each stanza.  For example you might focus each stanza on a word but creating a complete movement of narrative story poem. 

bullet train  very fast express train

pupil  round contractile aperture in iris of eye

topknot  tuft, roll, or fluff of hair at crown

blind date  arranged meeting between previously unacquainted people

billet-doux  love letter

two-time   (vb) Informal. jilt or betray, esp. one’s lover

con spirito  (adv) with spirit or animation

arrangement


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CBWP 2009-11  March 25, 2009
Writers only have words to make the story, poem, song, novel, screenplay come alive.  Structure is still important the: who, what, when, where and how.  You still must use words more efficiently to create images or movies in the reader's mind.  How?

Use nouns and verbs--the best you can find.  Where do you find these?  In dictionary, thesaurus basically.  Don't just use any noun--use a specific noun.

Any ol noun: Dog              Specific/descriptive noun: Hound Dog
Which of the two creates the better picture?

Any ol verb:  run               Specific/descriptive verb: sprint
Which of the two creates the better picture?
Let's watch H allie's Hound Dog sprint?

Prompt today is to complete a short sketch about a dog.  *Hint*




CBWP 2009-12  March 25, 2009
We writers must use words more efficiently to create images or movies in the reader's mind.  How?

Use adjectives.  I know. . . the best writers use only specific/descriptive nouns and specific/descriptive verbs.  Until you get there use adjectives.  Adjectives describe nouns.

Specific/descriptive noun: Abyssinian cat
Specific/descriptive adjective:   Bulky
Hallie's bulky Abyssinian Cat brought home an eagle today!
The adjective adds something visually to the sentence doesn't it?

Prompt today is to use complete a short sketch about a cat.  *Hint*



CBWP 2009-13  March 25, 2009
LOL.  You know what we writers only have to use: Words.

Use adverbs.  I know. . . the best writers use only specific/descriptive nouns and specific/descriptive verbs.  Until you reach that level use adverbs.  Adverbs describe verbs.

Specific/descriptive verb: hesitated
Specific/descriptive adverb:   surprisingly
Hallie's salamander hesitated surprisingly before running under the front door. 
The adverb put more life visually into the sentence doesn't it?

Prompt today is to use complete a short sketch about a salamander.  *Hint*

If you're songwriter check under my Links page.  Songwriters use adjectives and adverbs because it's the fastest way to say a lot in a few words! 
                                             Next Writing Prompt  2009 page 2
You're asking.  Can I send you my story? No. 
What you can do?  Send your story to http://www.duotrope.com
For a small fee of $5, from duotrope.com you can send your fiction or poetry, in an organized way, to ezines, traditional publishers, books, magazines who are interested in publishing good works.